Active Ingredients of Taoist Soap Report

This report analyses the Taoist soap and its active ingredients to find out what is the active ingredient in the soap that makes it effective in fighting inflammation and in turn, reduce hair loss, and possibly grow thicker hair. 

Methodology

There were 6 groups in total which included three control groups that were using a plain bar of soap made simply from a base.

The first group was using the Taoist soap, once a week, applying for 3 minutes and washing.

The second group was using the Taoist soap once a week, but only leaving it in for 3-5 seconds before washing it off.

The third group used the Taoist soap once a week, leaving it in for only 3-5 seconds before washing off, but they also carried out a scalp massage every day before they went to bed for 15-20 minutes in a row. They weren’t instructed on how to do this, and were simply told to do this however they feel will benefit them.

The fourth (control) group applied the normal soap, once a week, applying for 3 minutes and washing.

The fifth (control) group applied the normal soap, once a week, leaving it in for only 3-5 seconds before washing it off.

The sixth (control) group was doing the same as the third, except they used a normal soap bar instead of the Taoist soap bar.

Results

The experiment showed interesting results with the group that resulted in the most effective use of the Taoist soap being the one that used the Taoist soap for 3-5 seconds and washed off, once a week – combined with daily scalp massage.

The study already predicted that fourth group will be possibly the highest, as we know that scalp massage does increase circulation in the scalp, and will benefit hair growth overall. Click here to find the full experiment of Taoist soap on hair loss.

Conclusion/Discussion

Active ingredients of the Taoist soap were not found which suggests that the ingredients work in harmony with each-other in a specific ratio, to produce the desired results – this needs more study to find out how this synergy works with ingredients. Whilst it is unheard of in western medicine that one ingredient cannot be identified, the concept has been around in Chinese Medicine for thousands of years that ingredients in certain ratios will produce more powerful effects than 1 or 2 ‘active’ ingredients. Further research should aim to identify how this process is working on a biological level.

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